15th Marine Expeditionary Unit

 

15th Marine Expeditionary Unit

Team BULLRUSH

Camp Pendleton, CA
Mission
The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) provides a forward deployed, flexible sea-based Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) capable of conducting Amphibious Operations, crisis response and limited contingency operations, to include enabling the introduction of follow-on forces, and, designated special operations, in order to support the theater requirements of Geographic Combatant Commanders (GCC).

U.S. Marines with Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron (VMGR) 352 load a High Mobility Artillery Rocket System into a KC-130J Hercules during Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Air Station Camp Pendleton, California, Feb. 8. Exercise Iron Fist provides realistic, relevant training necessary for effective combined military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Britany Rowlett)
U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Robert Carretero, a section leader with 3rd Assault Amphibian Battalion, 1st Marine Division, clears an assault amphibious vehicle to enter the water during Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 23. Iron Fist is an annual, bilateral training exercise between U.S. and Japanese forces that builds their combined ability to conduct amphibious and land-based contingency operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas Spencer)
A U.S. Marine with 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division and Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers with Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade, tape a water charge explosive for urban breaching training during Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 28. Iron Fist is an annual, bilateral training exercise between U.S. and Japanese forces train together and share techniques, tactics and procedures to improve their combined operation capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. David Luckey)
Japan Ground Self-Defense Force SFC Genki Yatsuyanagi with Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade, climbs a rock formation during an assault climbers training as part of Exercise Iron Fist 2020 at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 28. Iron Fist provides realistic, relevant training necessary for effective combined military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Anabel Abreu Rodriguez)
Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers with Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade and U.S. Marines with 1st Reconnaissance Battalion pull a combat rubber raiding craft to shore during Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 21. Iron Fist enhances opportunities for the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force and the U.S. Marine Corps to share expertise in the use of amphibious vehicles, combined arms and amphibious doctrine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Britany Rowlett)
Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers with Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade post security during a night reconnaissance mission as part of Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 21. Iron Fist enhances opportunities for the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force and the U.S. Marine Corps to share expertise in the use of amphibious vehicles, combined arms and amphibious doctrine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Britany Rowlett)
U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Marcos Vidal, right, a team leader with Force Reconnaissance Company, 1st Reconnaissance Battalion leads U.S. Marines and Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers with Reconnaissance Company, Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade in a helocast jump during Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 22. Iron Fist is an annual, bilateral training exercise between U.S. and Japanese forces that builds their combined ability to conduct amphibious and land-based contingency operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Patrick Crosley)
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Salomon Segura, an assault amphibious vehicle section leader with 3rd Assault Amphibian Battalion, drives an AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicle into the water during Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 19. Exercise Iron Fist provides realistic, relevant training necessary for effective combined military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Britany Rowlett)
U.S. Marine Corps 1st Lt. Andrew Cannon, a company commander with 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, discusses fast-rope training plans with Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers with Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade during Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 22. Iron Fist is an annual, bilateral training exercise between U.S. and Japanese forces that builds their combined ability to conduct amphibious and land-based contingency operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas Spencer)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Alexander Pritchard, a crew chief with 3rd Assault Amphibian Battalion, prepares an AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicle for section-level beach landing training during Exercise Iron Fist 2020 on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Jan. 20. Exercises like Iron Fist enhance the Marine Corps ability to quickly deploy sea-based assets and provide military forces anywhere in the world. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Desiree King)
U.S. Marine Corps Col. Jay M. Holtermann, right, the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit outgoing commanding officer, passes the colors to Col. Christopher J. Bronzi, incoming commanding officer, during a change of command ceremony at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Nov. 13, 2019. A change of command is a military tradition that represents a formal transfer of authority from one commanding officer to another. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Mackenzie Binion)
U.S. Marines assigned to Marine Light Attack Helicopter Squadron 269 utilize an UH-1Y Venom aircraft to transport infantry Marines with 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division throughout the training area during Assault Support Tactics 4, as part of Weapons and Tactics Instructors Course 1-19 at Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., Oct. 9, 2018. WTI, a seven week training event hosted by Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron 1, emphasizes operational integration of the six functions of Marine Corps aviation in support of a Marine air-ground task force. This year, Marines and Sailors with the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Crisis Response-Central Command 19.1 served as the command element for WTI. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Mackenzie Binion)
U.S. Marines with Weapons and Tactics Instructors Course 1-19, use MV-22B Ospreys for combat assault transport of Marines and equipment during Assault Support Tactics 4, at Strategic Expeditionary Landing Field, Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., Oct. 9, 2018. WTI, a seven week training event hosted by Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron 1, emphasizes operational integration of the six functions of Marine Corps aviation in support of a Marine air-ground task force. This year, Marines and Sailors with the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Crisis Response-Central Command 19.1 served as the command element for WTI. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Zachary Catron)
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Jacob Wright, motor vehicle operator assigned to Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force Crisis Response-Central Command 19.1, shows blisters sustained from utilizing an entrenching tool (E-tool) to dig trenches for burying wire during Talon Exercise 1-19 at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Arizona, Sept. 30, 2018. TALONEX is a pre-deployment training event that integrates elements of the SPMAGTF and tests their capabilities when faced with simulated scenarios. Marines took precautions such as digging trenches and filling sandbags in preparation of inclement weather that was sustained during the exercise.
U.S. Marines with 5th Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, practice launching rockets from a high mobility artillery rockets system in a specified training area as part of Assault Support Tactics 2 during the Weapons and Tactics Instructor Course 1-19 at Landing Zone Star Assault, Chocolate Mountain Aerial Gunnery Range, Calif., Oct. 3, 2018. WTI is a seven-week training event hosted by Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron 1, which emphasizes operational integration of the six functions of Marine Corps aviation in support of a Marine air-ground task force. The course also provides standardized advance tactical training and certification of unit instructor qualifications to support Marine aviation training and readiness, and assists in developing and employing aviation weapons and tactics. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jeremy Laboy)
1st Lt. Patrick Nugent, a platoon commander with Charlie Company, Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, directs his Marines into their positions during an assault on the airfield at the Ie Shima Training Facility, Okinawa, Japan, Feb. 12, 2016. Marines and sailors with the 31st MEU flew from the USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) to Ie Shima for a vertical assault as part of amphibious integration training with the Navy ships of the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group. The 31st MEU is currently deployed to the Asia-Pacific region. Nugent is a Cleveland native. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Zachary Dyer/Released)
U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Sept. 29, 2017) – Marines and Sailors with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit and America Amphibious Ready Group practice Combat Life-Saving skills aboard the amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6). The Course implemented the use of an IV and the proper protocol when used to save a fellow brother or sister in arms. The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit is embarked on the America ARG and is deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Dusty Kilcrease)
U.S. Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Logistics Combat Element conduct physical training as part of their combat conditioning portion during a Marine Corps Martial Arts Program brown belt course held aboard the amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52) in the 5th Fleet area of operations Sept. 29, 2017. The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit was embarked on the America Amphibious Ready Group and is deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. F. Cordoba)
U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Sept. 26, 2017) – Sailors with the America Amphibious Ready Group prepare an MV-22B Osprey for take off aboard the amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6). The Osprey is designed for expeditionary assault support, raid operations, cargo lift and support to special warfare, it is capable of vertical takeoff and landing, and short and takeoff and landing (VSTOL). The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit is embarked on the America ARG and is deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Dusty Kilcrease)
U.S. 5th FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Sept. 24, 2017) – A helicopter descends to deliver cargo aboard USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52) during a vertical replenishment (VERTREP) with the Lewis and Clark-class dry cargo ship USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11). The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit is embarked on the America Amphibious Ready Group and is deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. F. Cordoba)
U.S. 5th FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Sept. 23, 2017) – Sailors aboard the amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52) load a Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB) onto the ship after conducting a personnel transfer mission. The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit is embarked on the America Amphibious Ready Group and is deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. F. Cordoba)
U.S. 5th FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Sept. 22, 2017) – Cpl. Santiago Garces and Cpl. Rigger Velasquez both Light Armored Reconnaissance vehicle crewmen with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Battalion Landing Team spar during a green belt course part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program aboard the amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52). The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit is embarked on the America Amphibious Ready Group and is deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. F. Cordoba)
U.S. 5th FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Sept. 21, 2017) – A CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter prepares to depart the amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52) after picking personnel up for a transport mission. The 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit is embarked on the America Amphibious Ready Group and is deployed to maintain regional security in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. F. Cordoba)
U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (Sept. 18, 2017) – Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit Ground Combat Element, Company C conduct squad attack maneuvers during Alligator Dagger. Alligator Dagger is an amphibious exercise with the America Amphibious Ready Group and 15th MEU, in order to increase proficiency and enable the force to train for amphibious operations within U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jacob Pruitt)
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 11th Marines, Charlie Battery, the non-lethal weapons company for the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), practice baton jabs and conduct other non-lethal weapons training on Camp Pendleton, Calif., Feb. 14, 2017. The 15th MEU used this training to sharpen their skills in a variety of non-lethal weapons tactics they would use to stabilize hostile situations. These non-lethal capabilities add to the flexibility of the MEU to shape actions across the range of military operations to resolve conflict anyway in the world. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Pruitt)
A U.S. Marine assigned to the 1st Battalion, 11th Marines, Charlie Battery, the non-lethal weapons company for the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), demonstrated he can still maintain cognizance and bearing with a hostile individual after taking a shot of OC spray to the face during OC certification on Camp Pendleton, Feb. 14, 2017. The 15th MEU used this training to sharpen their skills in a variety of non-lethal weapons tactics they would use to stabilize hostile situations. These non-lethal capabilities add to the flexibility of the MEU to shape actions across the range of military operations to resolve conflict anyway in the world. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Pruitt)
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif.—A Marine with Explosive Ordnance Disposal detachment, Combat Logistic Battalion 15 attached to the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit prepares to use X-Ray equipment to gain better situational awareness of a suspected improvised explosive device as he conducts IED training aboard Camp Pendleton, Feb. 22, 2017. The EOD Technicians, like all other forces of the 15th MEU, undergo critical training prior to deploying to ensure they can operate in any hostile mission area. (USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Pruitt)
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. — Staff Sgt. Ryan May, an Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician with Combat Logistic Battalion 15 attached to the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, studies X-Rays taken of a suspected Improvised Explosive Device as he conducts IED training on Camp Pendleton, Feb. 22, 2017. The EOD Technicians, like all other forces of the 15th MEU undergo critical training prior to deployment to ensure they can operate in any hostile mission area. (USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Pruitt)
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif.— A Percussion Actuated Neutralizer tool disables an Improvised Explosive Device with a high impact round activated by Explosive Ordnance Disposal technicians who took cover out of the blast radius during an IED training exercise on Camp Pendleton, Feb. 22, 2017. The EOD Technicians, like all other forces of the 15th MEU, undergo critical training prior to deploying to ensure they can operate in any hostile mission area. (USMC photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Pruitt)
Lance Cpl. Kaenon Ralls of Easton, Kan., works as a supply administrator for Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161 (Reinforced), 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), and is currently temporarily assigned to the ship store , where comfort items, hygiene gear and some uniform items are available for Marines and Sailors aboard amphibious assault ship USS AMERICA (LHA 6) during underway periods. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Nathaniel S. McAllister)
PACIFIC OCEAN, Calif., – Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary disembark from the USS San Diego (LPD-22) aboard a CH-53E Super Stallion with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161 (Reinforced) to be transported to the USS America (LHA-6), April 10, 2017. The 15th MEU uses air assets to transport personnel between ships during PHIBRON-MEU integration. The 15th MEU’s rapid ability to mobilize people and equipment makes the amphibious force uniquely postured to respond to any mission around the globe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Pruitt)
PACIFIC OCEAN, Calif., – A CH-53E Super Stallion lifts off from the flight deck on the USS San Diego (LPD-22) to transport Marines and equipment to the USS America (LHA-6), April 10, 2017. The 15th MEU uses the air assets provided by Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161 (Reinforced) to transport personnel and equipment ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore efficiently. The 15th MEU’s rapid ability to mobilize people and equipment makes the amphibious force uniquely postured to respond to any mission around the globe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Timothy Valero)
PACIFIC OCEAN, Calif., – A Landing Craft, Air Cushion with Navy Assault Craft Unit 5 approaches the well deck of the USS San Diego (LPD-22) during PHIBRON-MEU Integration, April 8, 2017. PMINT is the first at-sea training exercise and an opportunity for the Marines and Sailors to work as one team to complete essential missions. This exercise lays the foundation for all the elements of the 15th MEU to develop relationships with their Navy counterparts and gain an understanding of the teamwork necessary to accomplish the mission with a focus on facilitating the integration of the blue-green team. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Timothy Valero)
PACIFIC OCEAN, Calif., – Marines with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161 (Reinforced) attached to the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit load a RQ-21A Blackjack intelligence surveillance reconnaissance drone onto the launcher in preparation for its first flight during PHIBRON-MEU Integration, April 9, 2017. The RQ-21A Blackjack has the ability to collect critical information which in turn better prepares the Marines and Sailors for any mission that may occur while deployed. The 15th MEU is part of the nation’s crisis response force of choice. With the latest in technology and equipment, the MEU is capable to respond to and crisis or mission around the globe. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Timothy Valero)
PACIFIC OCEAN, Calif., – Marines with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 161 (Reinforced) conduct routine inspection and maintenance after a MV-22B Osprey landed on the flight deck of the USS San Diego (LPD-22) during PHIBRON-MEU Integration, April 8, 2017. PMINT is the first training period the 15th MEU and America Amphibious Ready Group team up to train for the upcoming deployment later this year. The amphibious force contains an extensive set of ship-to-shore connectors, by air or by sea, which allow the 15th MEU to move people or equipment to any corner of the world when called upon. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Timothy Valero)
PACIFIC OCEAN, Calif., – An Assault Amphibious Vehicle with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit Battalion Landing Team drive off the edge of the USS SAN DIEGO’s (LPD-22) well deck to conduct amphibious training during PHIBRON-MEU Integration, April 8, 2017. PMINT is the 15th MEU’s first at-sea training exercise integrating with the Navy to accomplish mission critical tasks. The distinct ability of amphibious forces to gain access to critical areas anywhere in the world with ground, air, and logistics forces enables the Navy-Marine Corps team to shape actions across the range of military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Timothy Valero)
PACIFIC OCEAN, Calif., – A Marine with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, Maritime Raid Force waits aboard the USS San Diego (LPD-22) to load on to a rigid haul inflatable boat to conduct a vessel board search and seizure mission during PHIBRON-MEU Integration, April 7, 2017. VBSS missions are conducted on hostile vessels to capture high value individuals along with collect intelligence to aid future missions. The 15th MEU undergoes demanding unit-level certification in order to be proficient in rapidly mobilize people and equipment to make the amphibious forces postured to respond to any mission. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Timothy Valero)
PACIFIC OCEAN, Calif., – Marines with the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, Maritime Raid Force and Sailors with the USS San Diego (LPD-22) are greeted by dolphins before setting off on their vessel board search and seizure mission during PHIBRON-MEU Integration, April 7, 2017. VBSS missions are conducted on hostile vessels to capture high value individuals along with collect intelligence to aid future missions. The 15th MEU undergoes demanding unit-level certification in order to be proficient in rapidly mobilize people and equipment to make the amphibious forces postured to respond to any mission. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Timothy Valero)
SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND, Calif., -- Lance Cpl. Richard Kanz, a rifleman with 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, Battalion Land Team 1st Battalion 5th Marine Regiment provides security after offloading Assault Amphibious Vehicles during a PHIBRON-MEU Integration amphibious assault, April 5, 2017. PMINT is the first at-sea training period and an opportunity for Marines with 3rd Amphibious Assault Battalion and BLT 1/5 to conduct amphibious assaults on varying objectives in preparation for deployment later this year. This exercise lays the foundation for all the elements of the 15th MEU to develop relationships with their Navy counterparts and gain an understanding of the teamwork necessary to accomplish the mission with a focus on facilitating the integration of the blue-green team. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Timothy Valero)
15th MEU Videos
15th MEU to execute Realistic Urban Training prior to deployment
Marine Corps story by Cpl. Hannah Perkins, video by Cpl. Timothy Valero

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – Marine and Sailors of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit will execute Realistic Urban Training March 6-18, 2017, from Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center 29 Palms, California, and varying cities in Arizona, in order to prepare for their upcoming deployment later this year.

The MEU is the nation’s rapid-response force, everything the Marine Corps does contributes to combat readiness, combat effectiveness, and trains Marines to move seamlessly between land-based exercises and amphibious forces. RUT is a land-based MEU exercise that provides Marines with the opportunity to practice individual and unit strengths, and develop a skill set in challenging and unfamiliar environments.

RUT provides an opportunity for Marines to refine their skills in operating in urban environments to be an effective fighting force and develop a better understanding how to operate in urban environments they are otherwise unaccustomed to for specialized raids of a limited scale.

“RUT is one of the field events where we build on the continuum of training we undergo prior to actually getting out the door and going on deployment,” said Major Christopher Baker, 15th MEU fire support officer.

A combination of live-fire daytime raid, helicopter-based raids, tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel missions, and two off-base nighttime raids help develop the ability of the MEU Command Element, Air Combat Element, and supporting components of the Ground Combat Element, Logistics Combat Element, and the Maritime Raid Force to execute the MEU’s standing missions while deployed as America’s crisis response force.

“This exercise helps Marines and Sailors by giving them an opportunity to build their confidence about what they need to do,” said Baker. “This basically gives us the time to hone our skills and prepare for our certification – the final test, and, in my opinion, the good things we will accomplish while deployed.”
Up Next
Now Playing
15th MEU to execute Realistic Urban Training prior to deployment
0:32
15th MEU to execute Realistic Urban Training prior to deployment
Marine Corps story by Cpl. Hannah Perkins, video by Cpl. Timothy Valero MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. – Marine and Sailors of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit will execute Realistic Urban Training March 6-18, 2017, from Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center 29 Palms, California, and varying cities in Arizona, in order to prepare for their upcoming deployment later this year. The MEU is the nation’s rapid-response force, everything the Marine Corps does contributes to combat readiness, combat effectiveness, and trains Marines to move seamlessly between land-based exercises and amphibious forces. RUT is a land-based MEU exercise that provides Marines with the opportunity to practice individual and unit strengths, and develop a skill set in challenging and unfamiliar environments. RUT provides an opportunity for Marines to refine their skills in operating in urban environments to be an effective fighting force and develop a better understanding how to operate in urban environments they are otherwise unaccustomed to for specialized raids of a limited scale. “RUT is one of the field events where we build on the continuum of training we undergo prior to actually getting out the door and going on deployment,” said Major Christopher Baker, 15th MEU fire support officer. A combination of live-fire daytime raid, helicopter-based raids, tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel missions, and two off-base nighttime raids help develop the ability of the MEU Command Element, Air Combat Element, and supporting components of the Ground Combat Element, Logistics Combat Element, and the Maritime Raid Force to execute the MEU’s standing missions while deployed as America’s crisis response force. “This exercise helps Marines and Sailors by giving them an opportunity to build their confidence about what they need to do,” said Baker. “This basically gives us the time to hone our skills and prepare for our certification – the final test, and, in my opinion, the good things we will accomplish while deployed.”
Featured Stories
15th MEU Change of Command Ceremony By | November 13, 2019
U.S. Marine makes miraculous recovery By Sgt Timothy Valero | June 4, 2018
Lighting the Way for Command and Control By Cpl. Jeremy Laboy | April 12, 2018
15th MEU, America ARG complete combat rehearsal Alligator Dagger By Capt. Maida Zheng | September 21, 2017
15th MEU’s BLT conducts combat rehearsals during Alligator Dagger By Lance Cpl. Jacob Pruitt | September 16, 2017
15th MEU Videos


Links
 
 
 
 
   
   
 

**The appearance of the hyperlinks that are external to Official Marine Corps web sites does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Marine Corps of the associated web sites or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the U.S. Marine Corps does not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at other than official Marine Corps websites.